Nightwatchman’s chair

I’ve always had a soft spot for uncomfortable furniture. So I was delighted to find the image of this little stool inspired by Pieter Bruegel’s Twelve Proverbs expertly crafted by “Yorkshire Stewart” His description and Bruegel’s painting are below.

Nightwatchman's chair, Yorkshire Stewart.


“In the Musée Mayer van der Bergh, Antwerp, Belgium is an oil painting on wood by Pieter Bruegel the Elder (1525 – 1569). It depicts Twelve Flemish Proverbs. One of the proverbs shows a peasant sitting on the floor between two stools. The text on the panel tells us: ‘In the past I was the greatest glutton of all. Now I have lost everything and I am left sitting in the ashes between two stools.’

The triangular stools were a Northern European style throughout the Middle Ages. The type appeared in many paintings of the 15th to 17th Century and were acceptable to all levels of society.

The style is sometimes called a nightwatchman’s chair or I’ve heard it called a cockfighting chair as it’s just as comfortable leaning forward; legs straddling the upright.”

Twelve Proverbs, Pieter Bruegel the Elder, c. 1560. (Image: WikiPaintings)

One response to “Nightwatchman’s chair

  1. I have a one-of-a-kind handmade chair my grandfather built for a cabin in Alaska he was a Trapper and gold miner and he called this thing a Trappers chair kind of the same design but made out of log the base was a log split in half two legs on there front and a shorter leg in the rear and the upper side had a lean-to for your elbows or your arms on the higher end of the split log. He decorated it with little trinkets coins Bobcat teeth bullets all in laid into the wood of the log going across to lean on. It is a very unique piece of furniture it was passed on to me from my mother I can imagine it was built in the 1930s or 40s in Alaska where he had made a effort to open a hunting lodge which failed sadly.

What say you?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s