Tag Archives: sculpture

On the cover of Sculpture Magazine

al-hadid_sculpturemag_april2013_952px

In December of 2011 my UT colleagues and I collaborated with artist Diana Al-Hadid to fabricate a large scale sculpture commissioned by UT Visual Arts Center. I learned recently that this sculpture, “Suspended After Image,” is featured on the April cover of Sculpture Magazine. The portion that we fabricated with our CNC router is the bluish “cloak” on the left which I also posted about here and here. Hook’em!

To hell with a hand bag

Chartres has been on my mind a lot this week. In July of 1992, a few days after my eighteenth birthday I spent about three hours at Chartres as part of a whirlwind ten day tour of France. I remember very few visual details from those hours though I tried to see a much as I could in the meager time allotted to us. I suppose at the time I assumed that I would have the opportunity to see it again one day soon. After all, it was my second trip to Europe in as many years. It is curious how my European travels came to complete cessation after my parents were no longer picking up the tab.

I didn’t take any photos while there, instead trying to focus on more direct experience. But I did purchase the little print below. When I got back home that summer I had it matted and it has traveled with me to many dorm rooms, apartments and houses and it remains a source of reflection and inspiration. It is a fairly unremarkable image but it does give me hope that I will again one day gaze up in wonder at that amazing place.

A print which hangs in my workspace. “A demon leading a miser to Hell.” Chartres Cathedral, South Portal.

More a printmaker than sculptor: Himmelfarb

Blue Motive, John Himmelfarb, woodblock on stonehenge mounted to blocks of wood, edition of nine. 2011. 21 x 28 x 15 inches. Printed by Gabe Hoare and Steve Mueller.

Blue Motive, John Himmelfarb, woodblock on stonehenge mounted to blocks of wood, edition of nine. 2011. 21 x 28 x 15 inches. Printed by Gabe Hoare and Steve Mueller.

Though I have always defined my artwork as sculpture, I have come to realize that it is really much more in the tradition of printmaking. It’s just that I never get around to actually printing. I’m too enamored with the shiny plates.

Of course definitions don’t make new artwork or make artwork better but claiming an association with a particular craft tradition helps me talk about my work, which has always been a weakness of mine.

This revelation (which may have been already obvious to a casual observer) came about last month when, after viewing the Suspended After Image, I took a turn around the New Prints 2011 exhibition in the UT Visual Arts Center’s Mezzanine Gallery.

When I came around the corner and saw John Himmelfarb’s Blue Motive, I knew there was a place for me in the world of print making. For reasons that I still can’t articulate, (perhaps it is my career in technical theater, perhaps it was early exposure to pop up books) I am perpetually drawn to planar arrangements. Each plane, a separately composed image, thoughtfully assembled with more of the same — magic.